Archive for category Operational

iTunes 9 and Custom iTunes Folder

itunes-logo I am not a fan of the iTunes software or philosophy.  On Windows it’s sluggish, the UI is unconventional and awkward for the platform and it forces the user to accept a bunch of other software like Quicktime.  The philosophy is patronizing and heavy-handed.  Apple says, "don’t worry your pretty little head about where your files are, we’ll take care of everything."  And, "don’t sweat the music format, just play this where and when we tell you."

Unfortunately, it’s probably the best and only way to manage and sync content with my iPods, which I use mainly for exercise and road trips.  So I want all the MP3s available to other programs, like when I make family slideshow movies.  I want to store everything in a separate data volume (drive) that can be shared with my whole home network and backed up on its own schedule.  For me iTunes is a utility for subscribing to my podcasts, managing a few playlists and syncing with iPods.  It is not my media management tool.

But it wants to be.

Here’s how I moved my iTunes files after some experimentation and reading helpful snippets scattered on the ‘net.

Before You Do Anything

Back up your iTunes folder.  If you haven’t already customized everything already, on Vista or Win7 it’s usually somewhere like "C:\Users\<you>\My Music\iTunes".  Just copy the whole folder somewhere.  It may be very big if you have a lot of stuff in there.

If you’re transitioning from one computer to another, the safest bet is to also "Deauthorize" your computer first.  Then Reauthorize it later, after a reinstall.

Install iTunes

Just do a straight install.  Then quit the program.

Attach Your Library

OK, here’s the tricky part.  Go your old iTunes folder.  Mine was on "D:\Music\iTunes".  Maybe yours is on a removable disk or something.  In that folder is a file called "iTunes Library.xml".  Open it with a text editor like Notepad.  Make sure all the paths for all the music and podcast files are right.  Fix with Find-Replace anything that’s not right.

itunes-xml

Now edit the file "iTunes Library.itl" with Notepad.  It’ll look like gobbledygook.  Delete everything in the file and Save it.  That file should now exist, but be 0-bytes in size.

itunes-itl

Now launch iTunes while holding your SHIFT key down.  You’ll be prompted to choose a Library.  Browse over to your old iTunes folder and select the "iTunes Library" file there.  Presto, now iTunes will rebuild itself and point to your old iTunes folder!

If you want, you can now delete your default iTunes directory at "C:\Users\<you>\My Music\iTunes". 

Fix Podcasts

Podcasts may not get added automatically.  This is a pain.  So you’ll need to use File > Add Folder to Library… to find your old podcasts directories.  Then you’ll need to re-subscribe to them.

Final Tip: Scheduling Podcast Download

I don’t know about you, but I don’t like to leave iTunes running all the time.  With a bunch of podcasts subscribed, it tends to suddenly lag the internet while downloading.  Instead, I use the Task Scheduler to create a task to run iTunes once a week while I’m asleep.  This means you need to leave your computer on of course.  When it runs, as usual, iTunes tries to download any new podcast episodes.

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Going to Windows 7 64-bit

Last evening I bit the bullet and did it: I went for the Windows 7 64-bit Pro upgrade on my main home desktop.  Since I was upgrading from Vista Home Premium 64-bit, I needed to do a clean install, no in-place installs for me.  See the chart from Microsoft at Upgrading Your PC to Windows 7.

win7 After going through this, I have to say, it doesn’t seem worth it for the average consumer who’s already on Vista.  I suppose if you can do an in-place upgrade, that’s fine.  But wiping clean and re-installing everything, and running into compatibility problems with software…that can’t be worth it for most people.

If you’re buying a new PC with Win7, great.

So some of the snafus I ran into:

  • Norton Internet Security 2009 – not compatible and refuses to install.  Will need to get 2010 version for Win7 support…if I still want to stick with Norton.
  • Norton Ghost 14 – Win7 warns that it’s "incompatible".  Before installing anyway, I did some searching, including this amusing thread.  Sure enough, it seems to run just fine.  There’s no newer version to upgrade to yet anyway.  I’m also exploring alternatives, like Macrium Reflect and Acronis.
  • Microsoft Virtual PC 2007 SP1 – This one is vital to me, since I have several VPC images I use regularly.  In fact, using VPC images is one way these clean OS upgrades are feasible for me.  Officially, VPC 2007 is not supported for Win7.  Unofficially, it works fine, more or less.  You might wonder why I don’t spring for the built-in Win7 Virtual PC.  It requires hardware virtualization support.
  • Google Picasa 3.5 – The trick here is to take a backup of your old \Users\<you>\AppData\Local\Google\Picasa* folders and drop them in after installing a new Picasa.
  • iTunes – This was so convoluted, I’ll need a separate post…

As I was popping DVDs in, I was wishing Win7 included built-in ability to mount an ISO image as a removable drive.  I back up all my important (read: purchased) software discs, and this would have been a lifesaver.  I know, there are a number of 3rd party tools, but I’m not interested in inadvertently downloading malware.

Some highlights/changes in Win7 that most stuck me are: Windows Calendar is gone, WordPad & Paint got an overhaul, Super-Taskbar of course, Click-Titlebar+Shake, slicker Themes, included PowerShell, StickyNotes.  In short, lots of little superficial things.  Hopefully, stability and performance are what will impress me in the long run.

There’s still a bunch of stuff that needs to be installed, but it’s getting more usable…

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ASP and ASP.NET on IIS7 on Vista

For 90% of my web projects, I’m good with PHP configured under IIS7.  But there’s one that still needs “Classic ASP” support.  Since I’m on a new machine these days, I haven’t ever configured it to do development for this project.  Here are some tips to get that working on Vista:

  1. By default, turning on IIS in Vista doesn’t give you ASP or ASP.NET.  Go into Control Panel > Programs and Features (aka “Add/Remove Programs”)
  2. Turn Windows Features On or Off
  3. Under World Wide Web Services > Application Development Features check and enable ASP and ASP.NET 

    asp-on-vista

  4. Next, for a development machine, it’s useful to turn on debug error messages.  Open IIS Services Manager (Right-click on your Computer and choose Manage)
  5. Click on your Server icon under the “Connections” pane
  6. Double-click on “ASP”
  7. Expand “Debugging Properties” and set “Send Errors to Browser” to True (only do this on your development machines) 

    asp-config

 

This link from Microsoft’s “Learn IIS” site was helpful.

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Moving a SVN Repository from Machine A to B

Move all files off the old machine.  Check.

Clean the dust out of the machine, keyboard, mouse ball.  Check.

Find OS and drivers discs for the machine.  Check.

Transfer local project files over.  Hmm.

See, I’ve been using SVN + TortoiseSVN on Windows for years to manage source code revisions on my projects.  Love it, but I am still a n00b when it comes to SVN.

Now that I’ve moved to a new development machine, I need to move my whole project environment along with historical commits.  Searching on the ‘net yields some good answers, but no real step-by-step for a TortoiseSVN user.

BTW lots of searches would yield “svn export”, which doesn’t exactly do what I need here – it only makes a copy of the current revisions in the repository.

OK:

  1. Backup everything
  2. Make sure your SVN version is the same on both machines (just in case)
  3. Know your repository full path.  If you don’t know it:
    1. Find the root folder for your projects
    2. Right click > TortoiseSVN > Repo-browser
    3. Note the URL, like: file:///C:/Documents and Settings/Bob/Documents/SVN Repository
    4. That path, minus the “file:///” is what you want
  4. On the command line:
    svnadmin dump “C:\Documents and Settings\Bob\Documents\SVN Repository” > projects.dmp

    If you have a lot of projects, and/or a lot of history or big files, this may take a while to run, and may create a big file.  This is your whole repository and history of changes after all.

  5. Copy this big file over to your new machine, say to D:\projects.dmp
  6. On your new machine, create a new directory for the repostory, say “D:\SVN Repository"
  7. Create the repository: Use svnadmin create, or with TortoiseSVN right click on the” folder > TortoiseSVN > Create repository here
  8. On the command line, run:
    svnadmin load “D:\SVN Repository” < projects.dmp
  9. Now you can restore all the files: create your project directory, say “D:\Projects”
  10. Right click > SVN Checkout…
  11. The URL should point to your new repository.  Now do a fully recursive checkout. 
    svn-checkout

That’s it.  Repository and all history moved over.  Check.

Props goes to Digital Media’s nice instructions that helped guide me.

Update: After I did all this, it occurred to me that since the two machines were networked together, and could see each other, I may have been able to do this:

  1. Map a drive from machine A to B
  2. Right click > TortoiseSVN > Relocate…
  3. Move the repository over
  4. Pick up from step #9 above

Haven’t tried it, so can’t vouch for it.

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